Friday, 24 June 2016

The Next Chapter

Let us look at the breakdown of the referendum calmly.

Out of ten people, three said nothing at all.  Of the next six people, three wanted to Remain in the EU while three knew they wanted to Leave. The last person eventually voted for Leave, taking it over the dividing line.

This is not a landslide.  It would be wrong to make the mistake of 1975 and paint this as a definitive expression of national sentiment - not with almost a third of voices silent.  But now we know exactly the strength of  feeling in significant part of it, which is all that was ever necessary.   The elites have annoyed enough people over the political spectrum that only half the active electorate can be relied on to follow their recommendations.

The first thing is to stop annoying people by making enemies unnecessarily. Instead, look closely at the texture of people's lives and ask what can be done to foster the historically successful identity of the United Kingdom. It was last seen in 2012 at the Olympics, and it was confirmed - just - at the Scottish Referendum. 

Note, however, that almost half the active electorate voted Remain, and it is their country too.

The opportunity now is to take this solid expression of disapproval and let our ruling elites show they have understood: they got it wrong.  Sackcloth and ashes, please. 

Next, a delay while the parties take on board what has happened. They are so tired that they can barely think straight.  And that includes the Leavers.   Nothing in legal terms has happened, nor is it going to for months. 

A signal has been sent to the European Union - specifically Ms Merkel - "This is not your border to open."   Germany has twice plunged Europe in to war.   This signal prevents them from making the same old mistake but in a new way: i.e. thinking they own the place.

Now, let us have a cup of tea and remember we are British.  Exactly as we were yesterday.

6 comments:

Barnacle Bill said...

Well said WOAR; it is a time for reaching out, putting our differences behind us and coming together to build the future our grand children will be proud to inherit.

I will doff my old uniform cap in Cameroon's direction, he fell onto his sword as an honourable man would do. Plus by working his notice he gives some stability to the next few months.

However, as you point out we also have the festering sore of a political elite, one that must be re-educated back to serving their country and fellow country folk first.

I do wonder if we should consider the formation of a negotiating team of the best minds in the country rather than leave it just up to the politicians?

I do hope you remmeber to have a nice slice of cake with that cup of tea WOAR?

Woman on a Raft said...

It will be difficult as feelings are very bruised, but historically we have re-built the society before, notably after the Reformation and then again after the Civil War. Remember how cohesive the country felt at the Olympics? That was only four years ago.

I am sorry that Cameron has decided to go just as he was getting the hang of leadership. As for a negotiations; I disagree about it being impossible for him to run the negotiation team. I would have preferred him to have put his notice in at the Conference in October but not to have activated the leadership contest until after Christmas when people can pay attention to it. He said he was not going to fight another election, so staying at his post for another year was probably the original plan.

We will only get one shot at this, so we should not be hustled in to taking it prematurely by impertinent Euro-blatherskates saying we have to attend them at their pleasure. No. We go when we are good and ready. There has been too much of ordering the United Kingdom around. I am not in favour of activating Art 50 until we have a fully-briefed team in place, and they are not so easy to find. It is not just tricky EU law; we have to negotiate with many new partners and they are operating under other legal systems. I would rather be doing this after the US Elections. if only to take one unknown out of the equation.

As for cake, alas, at the moment I have to watch my rotund tum. It is very easy at my height and stature to be mistaken for a pillar box, especially if slotting in fruit cake sideways.

JuliaM said...

"Now, let us have a cup of tea and remember we are British. Exactly as we were yesterday."

Sums it up nicely. Welcome back to blogging, WoaR.. :)

Woman on a Raft said...

Thank you, JuliaM.

It will be a big ask; people who have campaigned so hard will need to be very polite to people who continue to be very rude in deed to them. But in truth, there was rudeness on both sides.

DtP said...

Hope all's well Mrs WoaR

I absolutely agree with you. I think to some degree the punters have been swizzed a bit - it's not so much leave as 'stop' but that's all I wanted, really. Give the punters first dibs - train the kids up, plan service provision - you know, the boring stuff. The proposal for the minimum wage rising to £9 I think was just an open door invitation which should still be extended where possible but not to the exclusion of kids already here.

Ofcourse it's a lot of work and I think there was quite a hint, especially with Cammo's resignation that they just couldn't be bothered - they've got their jollies and their full time wages for maybe a 1/3rd times work.

But yeah, the first hurdle has been cleared. I don't want a revolution - I want tea too!

Swiss Bob said...

Very good.